A community-driven weekly newsletter about what's happening in the Swift open source projects at Swift.org. Curated by Kristaps Grinbergs. Started by Jesse Squires, continued by Bas Broek. Published for free every other Thursday.


Issue #62

Written by: Jesse Squires

This week swift-stdlib-tool was open-sourced, a number of proposals were accepted, Swift releases have themes, and a new proposal for fixing access controls in Swift is now under review!

Read more »

Issue #61

Written by: Jesse Squires

This week on Swift Unwrapped we discuss SourceKit and the tumultuous tales of the community getting SourceKit compiling on Linux. Ted Kremenek announced that swift-stdlib-tool will remain in Xcode, and Itai Ferber shared draft proposals for new Swift-focused archival and serialization APIs for Foundation.

Read more »

Issue #60

Written by: Jesse Squires

This week we launched the Swift Unwrapped podcast! While Swift 3.1 development is chugging along with fixes and refinements, there’s worry in the community about the removal of swift-stdlib-tool from Xcode 8.3 beta. Also, this week will be known as “bring your own submodule proposal” week — there have been a number of different proposals on the topic.

Read more »

Issue #58

Written by: Jesse Squires

The biggest news over the past week (and likely disappointing for some) was that ABI stability has been deferred from Swift 4. In practice, ABI stability likely affects very few Swift users directly, and for those whom are affected it would be much worse to lockdown the ABI too soon rather than delay it further. In a sense, that leaves ABI stability as mostly a symbol of Swift’s maturity (or lack thereof). Aside from the obvious impacts of those affected by the lack of ABI stability, the major impact here is that iOS developers will continue to be required to bundle the Swift standard library with their apps. This is also a blocker for wider adoption of Swift within Apple (including eventually providing Swift-only APIs in the SDKs).

While inconvenient, this is not the end of the world. The Core Team is clearly dedicated to declaring ABI stability as soon as they reasonably can, and will continue working toward this goal during the remainder of the Swift 4 release cycle. Having said that, I think if there are delays for this beyond Swift 5, that’s when the community should begin to worry. In other news, a new manifesto on memory ownership landed this week and Slava fixed an 18-month-old radar! 😄

Read more »

Issue #57

Written by: Jesse Squires

This week changes to branch management for the swift-LLDB repository were announced, as well as a new Swift Syntax and Structured Editing library! This library aims to expand on the functionality provided by SourceKit and sounds like it could enable tons of great new tooling for Swift. Apple also announced WWDC 2017.

Read more »

Issue #56

Written by: Jesse Squires

This week there were updates from the Swift Server APIs work group, new SPM proposals, great community articles about protocols and standard library collections, and an announcement that swift-evolution (and swift-users) will be moving to Discourse. Given the volume on these particular lists, and the need to easily search, reference, and rehash previous discussions, I think this will benefit the community. It looks like the initial setup and migration may require substantial effort, but the Core Team is seeking help from the community. Read on to learn more!

Read more »

Issue #55

Written by: Jesse Squires

Welcome! This week we saw how compile-time cost is being addressed in Swift 3.1. The swift-evolution community discussed ABI stability, and there was also a meta-discussion on possibly moving away from mailing lists to a forum-based solution.

Read more »

Issue #54

Written by: Jesse Squires

This week was manifesto week, with a couple of new manifestos showing up in the main Swift repo a la Doug Gregor’s original Generics Manifesto. Additional interviews with Chris Lattner made their rounds on the web, and the first few proposals of the new year are under review — evidence that Boris Bügling does actually work sometimes. 😉 😄

Read more »

Issue #53

Written by: Jesse Squires

Welcome to the weekly! As of Tuesday, January 17 master branch development has officially switched to Swift 4.0. This marked the last periodic merge of master into the swift-3.1-branch branch. Anything else going into Swift 3.1 will now require approval from our new Swift overlord, Ted Kremenek. 😄 I suppose this means we’re officially commencing Swift 4 Phase 1.

Read more »

Issue #52

Written by: Jesse Squires

This week brought some very unexpected news. As you’ve likely heard, Chris Lattner will be leaving Apple and joining Tesla. The original author of the Clang Static Analyzer, Ted Kremenek, will be taking over as Swift Project Lead. While the timing certainly seems abrupt, these things rarely happen at “good” or convenient times. I’m sure he will be missed at Apple, and it’s certainly a great loss for the company. Let’s all wish Chris the best of luck! The good news is that the Core Team is still there — and they’ve been doing all the hard work lately anyway, right? 😉

One thing to note is that Chris is the first Core Team member to leave Apple and remain on the Core Team. Ironically, this makes him the first non-Apple member of the Core Team. In his note to swift-evolution, he mentioned that he intends to stay involved so hopefully the project will still benefit from his guidance and contributions!

Read more »

Issue #51

Written by: Jesse Squires

Welcome back to the weekly! Hopefully you enjoyed some time off over the last few weeks. As expected, the Swift project repos are back to buzzing with their usual activity. Welcome to 2017, let’s dive in!

Read more »

Issue #50

Written by: Jesse Squires

Welcome to the 50th issue of the weekly! It’s hard to believe we’ve reached this milestone! 😊

This week Ted Kremenek wrote an official post on the 3.1 release process. Swift 3.1 is intended to be source compatible with Swift 3.0 and set for release in Spring 2017. (Spring for those of us in the Northern Hemisphere. 😉) The final date to accept major changes for Swift 3.1 will be around January 16, 2017. As Chris Lattner noted: “Swift 3.1 is the first release to benefit from the new era of source compatibility, a result of swift-evolution refining and polishing 3.0!”

This will be the last issue for 2016. But don’t worry, I’ll still be periodically tweeting anything interesting. Swift.org will likely start to quiet down over the coming weeks. If you’re in the US, enjoy the holidays and (hopefully) time off. We’ll be back in January!

Read more »

Issue #49

Written by: Jesse Squires

Welcome to issue 49! As of December 3, Swift has been open source for 1 full year. 😱 🎂 Can you believe it? I’m not sure if it is harder to believe that this was Swift’s first year of open source development, or that it has only been 1 year. Congrats to the Core Team, contributors, and community!

Read more »

Issue #48

Written by: Jesse Squires

Welcome back to the weekly! There was definitely some quiet time during the holidays in the US, but the repos are back to buzzing with activity.

Read more »

Issue #47

Written by: Bas Broek

In this brief, a lot of swiftc crashes have been either fixed or identified, we discuss some proposals that are not yet in scope for Swift 4 Stage 1, and… well, let’s not spoil everything, shall we?

Read more »

Issue #46

Written by: Brian Gesiak

What’s there to say about a week like this? Might as well just talk about Swift.

In this brief, we discuss the 2016 LLVM Developers’ Meeting, “eager” bridging, and link to detailed instructions on how Swift contributors are testing for compile time performance.

Read more »

Issue #45

Written by: Jesse Squires

Xcode 8.2 beta was released. It is the final release to support Swift 2.3. Good Luck migrating if you haven’t yet! Other than this, Xcode 8.2 still bundles Swift 3.0.1 and the only other notable changes are SDK updates for the new MacBook Pro Touch Bar.

Read more »

Issue #44

Written by: Jesse Squires

What a week for Swift! Swift 3.0.1 is here, but what’s more exciting is the new Server APIs Work Group and Server APIs Project from Swift.org! See below for details. The Xcode 8.1 GM seed was released, which bundles Swift 3.0.1. There are a number of improvements in Swift 3.0.1, including SE-0138, SE-0139 and SE-0140. Check the release notes for more information. Additionally, iOS 10.1 and macOS Sierra 10.12.1 had their final releases.

In other news, Apple is holding a “Mac-centric” event this morning where they are expected to announce new Macs. I know a lot of developers in the community have been waiting for this. I’m still crossing my fingers for a new Thunderbolt display. 🤓 Let’s hope the announcements are good!

Read more »

Issue #43

Written by: Jesse Squires

Remember SE-0025? That’s the proposal that controversially introduced fileprivate. However, if you’re regretting this change (like me), then you might have another chance to be heard! See the mailing list discussion in this issue for details. This issue also covers “id-as-Any” and continues the on-going discussion about what should be considered a source-breaking change.

Read more »

Issue #42

Written by: Bas Broek

Swift 3? You mean Swift 4? Apple has further outlined their plans on the next version of Swift. And as a reminder, Chris Lattner explained back in July what’s in store for Swift 4 and its release plan. Forwards!

Read more »

Issue #40

Written by: Brian Gesiak

With 1,653 votes, this Twitter poll shows a majority of people building their current and future macOS/iOS apps in Swift. The poll is a good reminder that many professional app developers now rely on the Swift compiler, even as it continues to rapidly grow and change. On the one hand, that means contributors like you and I can have a positive, immediate impact on many developers. On the other hand, there’s a great deal of people who may be inconvenienced by a bug, so maintainers will need to be careful about how to vet contributions.

How has Swift grown this week? In this brief, we discuss conditional protocol conformances, building the Swift runtime for Android from a macOS host machine, improved diagnostics, and proposals to add compile time debugging options.

Read more »

Issue #39

Written by: Brian Gesiak

It was the Chinese philosopher Laozi who said 「千里之行,始於足下」, or “a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step”. Oh wait, or was that Joe Groff who said that the journey to Swift 4 begins with a single pull request…?

In any case, with major Apple releases out of the way, the Swift repositories are buzzing with activity. This week, we cover ABI FIXME cataloging, source-breaking changes, and cross-platform developments for Android, FreeBSD, and Cygwin.

Read more »

Issue #38

Written by: JP Simard

The push and pull of Swift’s duality as an open source project that’s intimately tied to closed source products came to a culminating point this week, with the official release of Swift 3.0 🎉, coinciding with Xcode 8, the Swift Playgrounds iPad app, iOS 10, tvOS 10 and watchOS 3. One can’t help but respect the amount of effort it must have taken to coordinate so many moving parts and align all these releases.

The Swift 3.0 release post on swift.org provides a great overview of all the changes that were included, tips to migrate, links to an updated Swift book, and other details about the release.

Apple is the first to share that Swift 3 was made possible by a significant number of community contributions, so all you fine readers deserve a moment to celebrate… ok, break’s over, Swift 4 won’t write itself, so read on!

Read more »

Page: 6 of 8